Picking GOTY the Right Way

Every year The Game Awards disappoints us all by choosing a list of five or six games to contend for Game of the Year that usually makes little to no sense. They always nominate the arguably but not necessarily correct choice, a correct second choice when compared to the first, two or three games that are justifiable but not really contenders, and inevitably one game that just absolutely should not be there, ultimately robbing a more deserving game. For this post, I only want to talk about the Game of the Year category from The Game Awards. I won’t discuss any of the other categories.

This year the nominees for Game of the Year, listed in the order as shown on The Game Awards nomination page are:

  1. Control
  2. Death Stranding
  3. Resident Evil 2 Remake
  4. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice
  5. Smash Bros. Ultimate
  6. The Outer Worlds

As soon as the nominees were announced, the debates and vitriol started to hit social media, as is tradition. This happens to be one of those really divisive years that always happens when a Kojima game is involved. I ended up tweeting a long thread about my views on how GOTY should be picked but then I realized that writing a blog post on the topic would be more appropriate because it would let me expand and describe my thoughts on the subject better than a string of 280 character blurbs. If you’d like to see the original twitter thread you can find it unrolled for easy viewing here.

Nominees.pngI want to clarify that the purpose of this post is not to try to tell people who to vote for specifically but rather to create an objective system for how people should approach voting for GOTY in general. This isn’t meant to be applied to any particular year of nominees but rather should act as a general guide that could be applied to any list of nominees in any year.

I think the first and most important part of choosing a GOTY is first defining what the term “Game of the Year” actually means, or more specifically should mean. As with real politics, a lot of people think GOTY means the nominee they enjoyed the most. This is incorrect thinking, in my opinion. GOTY, as with actual politicians, isn’t meant to best quantify your tastes in the options available. It’s meant to best exemplify the traits/values that define the award. In other words, you’re not supposed to vote for the thing you like but rather the thing that best exemplifies the topic you’re voting on. If you’re asked to vote which number is higher and the candidates are 5, 9, and 42, you’re supposed to vote for 42. It doesn’t matter if you like 5 better than 42. 42 is the highest number and thus the correct nominee to vote for. I believe GOTY can and should be approached with the same level of objectivity. The subjective portion is the debate about which of the nominees best meets the criteria of GOTY, but the criteria itself should be objective and the only basis of voting applied by each individual voter. That is to say, we might not agree on which game should be chosen as GOTY, but we should all agree on what GOTY is supposed to mean and be voting for whatever nominee we ultimately chose for the exact same reasons.

right waySo let’s define what GOTY actually means, or more accurately is supposed to mean. Listed on The Game Awards page as the description for the Game of the Year category is the following: Recognizing a game that delivers the absolute best experience across all creative and technical fields. That’s what GOTY is. It doesn’t say “Game I liked the Most” or “Game that got the Best User Score on Metacritic”. It’s supposed to be the game that best exemplifies the craft of overall game design and implementation within the highly competitive and comparative medium of video games. Let’s unpack that.

I believe that choosing the GOTY, based on the described category by The Game Awards, requires looking at several factors while considering a number of key points in order to keep things fair and balanced between the nominees. I’ll go over each one, in no particular order, separately before making a final conclusion on what I believe the GOTY pick for this year should be.

5 Pillars of GOTY.jpgA Game is made up of 5 Equally Weighted Factors

 

There is always debate about what matters most in a game. Is it the story, the gameplay, the graphics, or something else? Are certain factors more important than others? Can developers get a pass for cheaping out in specific areas of development? In my opinion the answer is always no. At base value a game consists of five areas of creativity that define its presentation to the player: Gameplay, Writing, Graphics, Audio, Length. None of these factors are more important than the others. They are all equally important in the creation of a video game and should all be weighted equally when comparing games. This is similar to how I have always approached reviews save for a larger focus on replay value and cost. The category isn’t Shooter of the Year. It’s GOTY. So the gameplay shouldn’t outweigh the story, because the story is no less important than the gameplay when “recognizing a game that delivers the absolute best experience across all creative and technical fields”.

A GOTY has to do all five things in tandem better than all the other nominees. The art of game development is understanding that there are limits to what can be done in each field with the time and resources available during development and deciding what can be sacrificed while maintaining an overall standard of quality higher than all the other games released that year, and ideally in previous years as well.

All-for-one-handsI’d like to take some time to discuss length specifically because it’s always a topic of debate. The appropriate length of a game is a very subjective topic that is often muddied by concepts like replay value. In my opinion, length also needs to be directly tied to actual value as defined by cost. I also think that a game being too long is just as problematic as a game being too short, but when factoring in value the longer game is always better than the shorter one. Replay value needs to be factored based on the level of direct repetition and the actual value of replay as opposed to subjective enjoyment.

A game that’s only 20 hours long that you enjoyed enough to play twice isn’t equitable to a game that’s 40 hours in one playthrough. Because it’s not accurate to say that everyone will want to replay the game. Replay value can only be counted towards length if there’s a legitimate reward of value for taking the time to replay it. This is hard for many games to do well; especially in the current landscape where nearly 100% of gamers are backlogged. There is no objective value in replaying Cuphead on the harder difficulty after completing it on the standard difficulty. If you completed it without using the easy mode then you experienced everything it has to offer content wise. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t replay the game on the harder difficulty if that’s what you want to do. But the game doesn’t magically double in length compared to the length of other games because you want to take the time to play it again. There’s no additional content, no meaningful rewards, and no alternate/additional story content gained from replaying the game on a harder than normal difficulty. It’s simply for love of the game, which can’t legitimately be applied because not everyone will love the game enough to want to play it again just for the fun of it.

replay value smash brosMultiplayer replay value is not authentic replay value. The length should only be counted based on the time it takes you to experience it all once. An hour of maps that you play 50 times is not objectively 50 hours of added gameplay. It’s one hour of gameplay you replayed 50 times. Length should only be defined by the amount of time it takes at face value to experience all the content the game has to offer one time.

GOTY doesn’t have to be replayable. It simply needs to provide the correct amount of gameplay for the best overall experience. A well-crafted one and done is no more or less valid than a game that asks you to play it multiple times. Especially if those replays offer little in the way of actual value outside of subjective enjoyment.

Each of the five topics should be weighted equally but compared separately between games. A game with shitty gameplay and great story is not better than a game with great gameplay and shitty story. Both are equally bad and should lose out to a game with both above average gameplay and story. But again it’s best of five categories. A game that does length, story, and audio better than a game that does gameplay and graphics better should win between the two. Because it’s a 3 factors to 2 factors comparison at that point. And three is higher than two. Now ideally this isn’t what ends up happening because it would be odd if in a given year the winner had garbage gameplay and graphics but the other nominees all had garbage audio, were too short, and were terribly written.

The Game Awards Nominees NoteThe Nominees Are the Nominees

The Game Awards gets the nominees as a whole wrong pretty much every year. There’s always at least one that just shouldn’t be there and there’s always at least one that absolutely got robbed. Last year it was Celeste that shouldn’t have been nominated. This year it’s Control. And make no mistake, no matter how much you personally may have liked Control, it wasn’t a more qualified contender for GOTY than Devil May Cry V, Astral Chain, and Fire Emblem: Three Houses. I have my thoughts about why Control was nominated but it doesn’t really matter. The nominees are the nominees and we can’t change that. Rather than fight about would should have been nominated, we should just accept the nominees and pick the appropriate choice from that pre-determined list of games and make sure not to allow the off pick to win or it could have devastating long term ramifications for the industry. It would have been absolutely horrendous if God of War and Red Dead Redemption 2 had lost to Celeste last year. And I’m speaking as someone who enjoys playing Celeste.

1200px-Port_of_Cape_Town
It’s a Port . . .

Ports, Remasters, Remakes, and Reimaginings

There is always debate about the validity and fairness of reused, rehashed, and remade games being contenders for GOTY. It’s a valid question and it’s hard to create a completely objective set of rules, but there are definitely obvious points that shouldn’t be considered debatable.

The issue comes down to comparative fairness, effort/work put in, and not allowing double counting. A game gets only one chance to win GOTY. Many games have come over the years that in other years would have definitely won GOTY. But that’s not how it works. A game has to be the best in the year it was released because all the games previously made were made with the knowledge of how the market responded to those past games. Letting a game get considered twice gives it an unfair advantage and more chances to win than every other game. It’s differentiating original games and their rereleased counter parts that’s tricky, but I say when in doubt always error on the side of caution.

02 The Last of UsThe question of fairness comes down to work put in compared to other studios in order to achieve comparable results, in each category. When given two games with similar levels of quality and no clearly superior choice, the one that did more work should be considered the winner.

Reimaginings don’t really need to be debated. If it’s a true reimagining where everything is redone, rewritten, and changed to the point of it not even being the same original game, then of course it should be considered as a potential GOTY candidate. Ratchet & Clank (2016) is an excellent example of a true reimagining that was absolutely valid to consider for GOTY. Note that “considered” does not mean “had an actual chance of winning” in this context.

20 Ratchet and ClankPorts and remasters by their very nature aren’t new games. Updating the graphics and adding a little DLC doesn’t compare to creating an entirely new game. The amount of time put into concept development, art style, visual assets, story development, voice acting, and so on just doesn’t compare to making a new game of similar quality. A port already got its chance at GOTY in its original form and shouldn’t be considered again. Remasters are glorified ports. A bit more work may have been put into improving them, but the bulk of the foundational work still doesn’t compare to all the new games released in a given year. Looking at examples like The Last of Us and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe from years past, it should be fairly obvious that like ports, remasters have no business being reconsidered as GOTY contenders.

Remakes are where things get tricky to define. There is no objective criteria for defining a remake. Some are little more than glorified remasters while others are completely new games. Some are able to reuse tons of assets while others have to start almost completely from scratch save for writing. So they need to be judged on a case by case basis. The one thing I think should be 100% undebatable is that in the event of a tie the remake should always lose out to an original release in the same year. Again, we need to take into account all five categories. The problem is that a true remake, such as Link’s Awakening, involves almost no creative development. The writing, assets, music, and length are all predefined. Yes a lot of work needs to be done to recreate those assets, but the creative aspects of the project simply don’t compare to that of making a new game from scratch. But again, it’s all comparative. If a remake looks genuinely better than all the original nominees in a given year then you give it the point for graphics. But if other games look similar or as good, then you award that point to one of the original titles. Directly ported things like writing shouldn’t be considered as valid for comparison. The points should never go to the reused content.

resident evil 2 remakeThis year’s nominees include Resident Evil 2 Remake. At face value many people do believe it was GOTY for 2019. I have to disagree. From what I’ve heard, the only thing about it that’s truly original is the gameplay. It’s been essentially redesigned. Everything else is pretty much a spirited recreation of the original game. That’s not to argue that Resident Evil 2 Remake isn’t a good game. Not including it is more an issue of fairness than an issue of quality.

I’m sure this issue will come up again with FFVII Remake next year. The difference is that Square Enix has stated that it will be intentionally different from the original. Having already tried the gameplay myself, I can say that it certainly looks and feels like a completely different game. But until we see how much of the game has changed from both a narrative and length standpoint it’s impossible to comment on whether or not it’s actually fair to consider it.

KojimaProductionsGame of the Year Doesn’t Mean Studio of the Year

A major issue that comes up a lot when judging games is the consideration of who made the game. This shouldn’t actually matter when picking a GOTY. The studio, director, actors, and so on are irrelevant. No matter how much you love Kojima, that doesn’t make Death Stranding a better game than it is. No matter how much you hate Ubisoft, that doesn’t make Ghost Recon: Breakpoint a worse game than it is. Games should be judged in a vacuum that only takes into account the comparative quality of each nominee. External factors, with the exception of how much content is actually original in the case of remake and remasters, should never be considered when choosing GOTY.

sekiro__shadows_die_twice_gxSales Numbers Matter, Long-term Popularity Doesn’t

GOTY implies it’s the game of the year for everyone, or more accurately a large percentage of gamers. That means that people had to actually play it, which implies they had to actually be interested in it. This is the sole reason that Control wasn’t appropriate to nominate. If a few people absolutely love a game, that’s great. But it’s not GOTY material. Because games are experiences made for an established gaming market. Making games that don’t appeal to that market may be innovative, but that’s not the point of GOTY. A contender needs to actually appeal to the community in order to be considered worthy of the title. Regardless of how much some people like a game, if few people were even interested enough to try the game then it’s not GOTY material. That doesn’t mean that the bestselling game in a given year should win that year. But there does need to be a minimum number of units sold to be able to imply that it appealed to a large percentage of gamers. Because GOTY is for everyone. Not just a small subset of people within a specific sub-group within the gaming community. Every gamer should be able to look at the GOTY and acknowledge it as a legitimate choice even if it wasn’t their favorite game in that year. That’s what was so good about the 2018 nominees. While there were two fairly clear frontrunners, five of the six nominees could have been chosen and no one would have legitimately been able to say the choice was biased. All six of the nominees were highly acclaimed and sold well. “Everyone” loved them all. Celeste wasn’t up to the standard of the AAA titles which is why it shouldn’t have been nominated, but other than that any of the games in the running appealed to gamers as a whole as opposed to a niche audience. You can’t say that about necessarily any of the nominees this year, mostly because the wrong games were nominated, but some games get closer than others. The ones that get closest are the ones that should actually be considered for GOTY.

Jedi Fallen Order WallpaperThe problem with the entire concept of GOTY is that it takes a year to decide on the nominees. That means that a game has to stay in people’s heads for a year. Honestly that’s a ridiculous ask. Because as I’ve said, one and done games are perfectly legitimate GOTY contenders. Take a game like Star Wars: Jedi Fallen Order. It just released in November 2019. It will be included in the running for GOTY 2020 because it missed the 2019 cutoff. The reviews are great. The public loves it as well. It might be the best EA game we’ve gotten since Mass Effect 3 and the best Star Wars game since The Force Unleashed II. But it’s ridiculous to think that we’ll still be talking about it in November 2020. Why? Because we’re about to go through a year containing Cyberpunk 2077, Nioh 2, The Last of Us Part 2, Marvel’s Avengers, Final Fantasy VII Remake, DOOM Eternal, Dragon Ball Z: Kakarot, and Yakuza: Like a Dragon just to name a few of the games coming in 2020. Even if Star Wars: Jedi Fallen Order is the objectively best game to release in the next year, we absolutely won’t still be talking about it after reaching the end of this gauntlet of big budget games and power house IPs. That’s not a fault of the game. It’s just the reality of an ADD ridden consumer base coupled with a constantly moving stream of new noteworthy games. It’s ridiculous to think we should still be talking about games we’ve already finished and moved on from after playing five or ten other impressive games released after it.

cyberpunk-2077Currently a lot of people are saying Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice isn’t being talked about anymore so it shouldn’t be nominated. That’s an irrelevant point. Since that game released in March, we’ve gotten Yoshi’s Crafted World, Mortal Kombat 11, Days Gone, Judgement, Super Mario Maker 2, Fire Emblem: Three Houses, Astral Chain, Monster Hunter World: Iceborne, Daemon X Machina, Link’s Awakening Remake, The Surge 2, Ghost Recon: Breakpoint, Luigi’s Mansion 3, Death Stranding, and Control. Of course we’re not still talking about Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. Why would we be? And this was considered a mediocre year by the way. It’s this thinking that I believe ultimately led to Devil May Cry V getting robbed of a nomination. It’s simply too old by this point, because it came out before Sekiro did.

It doesn’t matter if we’re still talking about a game when the awards season comes up. What matters is how the game compares in the five expressed categories compared to the other games released that same year coupled with whether or not it reached the unwritten popularity by sales threshold. Remember that Sekiro was the third highest selling Japanese game ever to release on Steam. It sold over 2 million copies worldwide within 10 days of release. It absolutely deserves to be considered as a legitimate contender for GOTY.

death strandingInnovation Doesn’t Mean GOTY

Innovation is a good thing in the gaming industry. But only if the innovation pans out as a positive thing. Games are still products made for consumers in an established market. If a product doesn’t appeal to that market, then it shouldn’t matter how innovative it is. Look at the Wii U. It was extremely innovative. People didn’t like it. We didn’t award it console of the year simply because it dared to be different. Nintendo went back to the drawing board and tried again. Now we have the Switch, which is super successful. Awarding GOTY strictly because of innovation is incorrect thinking. A game still has to appeal to the market and hit all the other points I’ve expressed in order to legitimately be considered for GOTY. Innovation is good, but a lack of innovation isn’t automatically problematic. If the people want the same old thing then a studio can and quite possibly should choose to give that to them. Because remember what GOTY means: a game that delivers the absolute best experience across all creative and technical fields. The fields never change. How studios approach them does but the same five categories are set in stone and will be for the foreseeable future. This is the question that needs to be asked about Death Stranding. A lot of people have argued that it’s the most innovative game in years so it should win. I disagree with that thinking. It may very well be the most innovative game we’ve seen in years. But does it beat out the other nominees for gameplay, writing, length, audio, and graphics? Maybe it does. If you think it actually does then that’s the game you should vote for. If you think it leads in innovation but not in a majority of the actual categories, then it’s objectively the incorrect game you should be voting for this year.

controlIn conclusion, your GOTY vote shouldn’t be for the game you personally liked the most. It should go to the game that you believe best meets the criteria set by The Game Awards which is defined as “recognizing a game that delivers the absolute best experience across all creative and technical fields”. All the nominees should be compared based on all the major factors that make up a gaming experience: gameplay, graphics, audio, writing, and length (based on value as defined by price).

Looking at the nominees, I have to say that the wrong list of six games was nominated for this year. But as I said, the nominees are the nominees and that can’t be changed. So we must compare these six games and make a GOTY selection based on them. The fact is that Control didn’t sell well and we don’t really have any sales figures available for The Outer Worlds other than the phrase “exceeded expectations”, whatever that means. Honestly both of those games weren’t nearly as popular as they needed to be to consider as legitimate GOTY contenders. I don’t think they even need to be compared to the rest of the group. Death Stranding I actually feel like is getting hyped due to Kojima and how close to the nominations announcement it released, so I will absolutely acknowledge it as a contender but I don’t believe something that niche would have necessarily been nominated over many of the games that got snubbed if it had released earlier in the year. Resident Evil 2 remake was definitely popular, definitely well made, and definitely a safe choice to nominate. But because of the fact that it’s a remake, I believe there are games that didn’t get nominated that are at least as if not more worthy for a nomination than it was. So I won’t consider it a legitimate pick for this year either. Really it comes down to Death Stranding, Smash Bros. Ultimate, and Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice as the only objectively acceptable picks for GOTY based on this list of nominees.

Nominees top 3 2019It’s interesting that two of these three nominees are console exclusives (at the time of nomination) and all three are Japanese developed games. Smash Bros. Ultimate is the most massively appealing with more than 12 million units sold the month of release as a console exclusive. But sales figures aren’t the only thing that matters. In fact, it’s not even close to the most important thing. So let’s go down the list of categories one by one.

Game of the Year 2019 Assessment

Gameplay

For gameplay I’d say Death Stranding is the most innovative, but it’s also the least appealing to a general audience of gamers. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice has the most controversial gameplay, having spawned an online controversy about accessibility in games. Smash Bros. Ultimate has the most accessible gameplay, but I’d also say it was the least innovative because this is several sequels into the franchise. But a lack of innovation isn’t a bad thing if it appeals to the consumer base. And the amount of additional fighters has drastically impacted the gameplay, even if only marginally to casual players. So I actually think that an argument could be made that Smash Bros. Ultimate wins out for gameplay not because the gameplay is necessarily superior but because of the three it’s the most widely liked/tolerated gameplay with little to no real controversy surrounding it.

Graphics

 It’s easy to say that Smash Bros. Ultimate has the least impressive graphics because of the art style but it also has the largest number of characters, settings, and objects of the three games in question. Counting it out really comes down to bias for art style more than objective comparison. That being said, many of the assets used in Smash Bros. Ultimate have been recycled from past games. Death Stranding has a much more expansive map than Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice but I wouldn’t argue that it’s necessarily a better looking game. Sekiro also has a lot more movement and interacting elements than Death Stranding. Between the three, I would give the win to Sekiro but I believe an argument can be made to award it to Death Stranding as well. Remember that the grading is subjective by nature. It’s the approach to grading that needs to remain objective.

Audio

 Comparing these three games for audio is tough. For music, it goes to Smash Bros. Ultimate. It has the largest library of music that pretty much any game has ever had. The sound effects for this fast paced fighting game are also fairly accurate and of great quality, especially for the hardware the game runs on. I’d probably award the audio category to Death Stranding over Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice but having not completed either game yet, I’m willing to acknowledge that my view on that could be inaccurate. When considering that most of the audio library for Smash Bros. Ultimate isn’t original content, I have to award the audio category to Death Stranding.

 Length

How do you compare length between a game with countless repetitive side missions, a die countless times Soulsborne title, and a fighting game? Honestly it’s hard to really define the length of any of these games and it’s even harder to decide if at least two of the games are the correct length for what they are. According to How Long to Beat, which isn’t necessarily a perfectly accurate rating system for game length, Sekiro is 27.5 hours for the main story while Death Stranding is 36. In general, longer is better if we assume neither game is longer than it needs to be. But there is an assumption that dying countless times to the same boss counts as fun. Equally so, there’s an assumption that delivering packages over and over is fun. The difference is that delivering packages is the point of the game, while dying is more of a repercussion of not playing the game well. The speedrun times for Sekiro come in at under 30 minutes while the speedrun times for Death Stranding come in at more than five hours while skipping cutscenes. So between the two I think Death Stranding beats out Sekiro for length. But we need to talk about Smash Bros. Ultimate. This is a fighting game, but it’s probably the most comprehensive fighting game ever made. There are 69 default characters plus six more DLC characters. If you play just 10 minutes per a default character, you’re already at 11.5 hours. The World of Light story mode is easily a three or more hour experience on its own. The spirit board mode is constantly updating. Plus there are a number of other modes like Classic Mode and the later added Homerun Contest all at no additional cost. Even if you never replay a single match and don’t play any online or PVP matches, you’re still getting way more bang for your buck from Smash Bros. Ultimate than you are in Death Stranding without having to arbitrarily add length to the games. So objectively speaking I have to award length to Smash Bros. Ultimate.

 Writing

At a glance most people will award the writing category to Death Stranding simply because it’s Kojima. I am not one of those people. I have always held that Kojima is a mediocre writer with interesting ideas. The fact that he uses names like Die Hardman, Deadman, and Mama for his characters is proof that he’s kind of an overrated hack when it comes to writing. That being said, his general narrative ideas are fairly good. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice isn’t necessarily amazing writing, but it is some of the best writing to come out of FromSoftware in this genre for the simple fact that the game actually has a running narrative with a defined main protagonist as opposed to the usual character creation lore fest with no actually story they use in Dark Souls and Bloodborne. Smash Bros. Ultimate needs to be commended for having actually created a story mode that had an actual story. Was it high writing? No. But it was a huge leap forward for the franchise as far as narrative content is concerned. Really all three games can be awarded this category for different reasons depending on how much stock you put into innovation, outside the usual box development practices, and your own narrative preferences. So I actually won’t award this category to any one game and will leave it as a three way tie.

the-game-awards-2019Final Conclusion

Based on my assessments, here are the final results.

  • Gameplay – Smash Bros. Ultimate
  • Graphics – Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice
  • Audio – Death Stranding
  • Length – Smash Bros. Ultimate
  • Writing – Three Way Tie

Based on these results here are the final scores.

  1. Smash Bros. Ultimate – 3 Points
  2. Death Stranding – 2 Points
  3. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice – 2 Points

My Vote GOTY 2019Ultimately I voted for Smash Bros. Ultimate as GOTY. At first glance I had chosen Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and had even tweeted as such when debating it with someone who had read my original thread. But after taking the time to really examine the games, I came to the conclusion that the objectively correct choice for me was Smash Bros. Ultimate, as I have shown here.

Now again, I’m not saying you should vote for Smash Bros. Ultimate. I’m saying that your vote should be justified with an objective criteria that adequately meets the definition of the GOTY category as defined by The Game Awards. Your vote should not simply be the game you liked the most or that was the most popular on social media. Even the game that had the highest Metacritic score isn’t automatically the correct choice. Only by comparing the games with an objective set of criteria that is fairly applied to all of them with as little bias as possible can we hope to accurately choose the GOTY. Voting for this year’s GOTY is still open until December 11th at 6PM so so make sure you vote and do your best to vote objectively.

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The Game Awards 2018

As this year comes to a close, I have to say that I have had the pleasure of playing some excellent games. Rarely do I get to play as many new games as I did during the release window in 2018. I was truly impressed by the offerings presented in this year of gaming. The Game Awards for 2018 are highly competitive. I’m sure, like with most years, the games that deserve to win will get beaten out by over hyped genre titles and pew pew FPS nonsense. But 2018 is one of those rare years where I’ll say that my choices for this year are heavily subjective and that it’s genuinely difficult to actually pick the best games of this year. As long as one of several titles takes the awards, I’ll probably have no complaints. The only things that would actually irritate me is if some ridiculous upset wins like Overwatch in 2016 (looking at your Celeste) or Red Dead Redemption 2 sweeps every category. As long as neither of these two things happen, I will probably be satisfied with the overall results.

For this year, I’ve decided to go over each category with a short summary of my thoughts on the nominees as a whole and then give both my pick and my prediction for what will actually win the award. For the purposes of space and time, I’m going to assume you’re actually looking at the list on the official website so I don’t have to take the time to actually type out all the nominees by hand. Click the link and it will take you to the nominees page in another tab.

The Game Awards Date

The Game Awards 2018

1. Game of the Year – God of War

I’m very comfortable with five of these six nominees. As I’ve already said, it was an extremely competitive year. I actually own four of the six GOTY nominees. I don’t remember the last time that was the case. My only complaint about this list is the inclusion of Celeste. I honestly don’t know how it got there. Let me be clear in stating I’m not saying it’s a bad game. From what I’ve heard it’s a pretty game. But just from looking at it, I can safely say that it wasn’t the sixth best game released this year. It wasn’t better than Detroit: Become Human. It wasn’t better than Starlink: Battle for Atlas. I doubt it was even better than Mega Man 11. So I have to ask, how was this indie platformer, that looks a bit like a Guacamelee clone, nominated for Game of the Year? It won’t win though, so we really don’t need to discuss it any further. I just think it’s sad that there are other games that deserved the nomination and were denied the privilege.

Though the other five choices were all excellent in their own right, I do believe God of War deserves it. It took an old franchise that personally I wanted to be left alone, completely changed the setting, the tone, the powers/combat, the mechanics of traversing the game, and the main character personality and managed to not only not screw it up, but did a damn great job without breaking canon. That is a tall order that I was sure they were gonna fail at. And they didn’t fail. Not necessarily by a wide margin, but I believe Kratos deserves to take home the crown.

While I do believe the winner should be God of War, I don’t think it will actually win. It will most likely be Red Dead Redemption 2, not because it particularly deserves it, but because it’s still fresh in people’s minds. It’s still extremely strong on the hype train and many people haven’t even finished it yet. It’s not that it’s the best of the year so much as it’s the flavor of the month. Great release tactic by Rockstar. I could also see it going to Spider-Man. This game was extremely well written. It played exceptionally. It has the Marvel hype. It basically revolutionized the comic book game genre, setting a new standard and probably franchise of games. And Stan Lee, who appears in the game, literally died the day before the nominees were announced. A lot of people will vote for the game simply in honor of one of the greatest and most popular men of our time. And while that does sound a bit cynical, it doesn’t mean it won’t happen. I’m still not 100% sure Heath Ledger would have won the Oscar for the Joker in The Dark Knight if he hadn’t of died. Whoever wins though, as long as it’s not Celeste, it will be an excellent game worthy of the title GOTY.

2018-4

2. Best Ongoing Game – No Man’s Sky

I personally don’t care for any of these games. I’ve played three of them and I wish at least three of them would just die. But that’s OK. I don’t need to like a game or even a category to judge it fairly. In fact my dislike for all these games makes fairer than most people. My pick is No Man’s Sky. I have no love for this game. I have been brutally critical about it on this blog, on Twitter, and to anyone who would listen. I saw it being a total shit show from the first announcement, and at release it was. I actually own the game. I bought it for $20 on Black Friday a year or two ago. I still haven’t taken the time to open it. But I have seen it make great improvements over time. They have patched in a lot. Improvements have been made. And I might have even enjoyed it if I had tried it before Starlink: Battle for Atlas. My opinion is that Starlink is everything NMS needed to be and wasn’t. And I’m still playing Starlink and will be for tens or even hundred more hours. So I have even less motivation to try NMS. But compared to the other games in this category, it has shown the most improvement and for all intents and purposes is a better game to begin with except for maybe Rainbow Six Siege which has been shitting the bed with political bullshit recently.

I’m not fool. I know Fortnite is gonna win. Nothing else needs to be said about that.

3. Best Game Direction – Spider-Man

This for me was a tough category. Because, contrary to popular belief, this isn’t about this best game. It’s about the best direction, vision, and innovation taken by a game. Every game on the list did that amazingly. I almost picked A Way Out, even though I’d say it’s the worst game in the bunch, because in many ways it is the most innovative. Ultimately though my pick is Spider-Man. Insomniac Games has set a new bar for comic book games. It’s also set a new bar for putting realistic modern settings in games. The writing was not only good, but surprising. Even though I knew from the start who the villains were and was going to become one, I was still moved by the narrative. The way they handled the relationship between Peter and Doctor Octopus was just excellent. The costumes and the powers that come with them were comic book relevant, diverse, looked awesome, and made playing the game a more personal experience. While it’s not my game of the year, the direction really was quite stunning.

While it absolutely doesn’t deserve it, I do believe the winner will be Red Dead Redemption 2. Again, because it’s currently the hype title. It has not really revolutionized the genre. It’s still a buggy, glitch filled Rockstar game. It’s very slow. And really we’ve seen everything it has to offer before. From Rockstar even. It’s really just a well-made sequel to an already well liked game. It is not the “game of our generation”. Really GTAV was much more revolutionary. But hype is hype and hype tends to win.

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4. Best Narrative – Detroit: Become Human

Best narrative was another tough one for me. God of War surprised me the most. I did not expect to enjoy the narrative as much as I did. I did not expect to identify with new Kratos as much as I did. Because I really identify with OG Kratos a lot. I thought I was going to hate Atreus, and at times I did, but by the end he did grow on me. What I don’t like about the game’s narrative is that it ends on a clear cliffhanger. Not only that but it spends much of the game setting up a conflict that never comes to fruition in the game itself. It plays like a timeless classic and then goes franchise right at the end. And that for me is bad writing. What I love about the original God of War is that it has a clearly defined ending. If they never made a second game, you would have no questions. And yet they also wrote it in a way where a sequel could be made without changing the canon. That’s the mark of a good game. Spider-Man does this exceptionally well. Great story, clearly defined ending, yet left open for future adventures, which it adds with the DLC and will continue to with future games. But each game can and hopefully will standalone. But I have to award this one to Detroit: Become Human. That game is powerful. I didn’t even really want to play it. I hated Beyond: Two Souls. I was done with David Cage. The only reason I even considered this one was how much it was blowing up my Twitter timeline. I did like the demo, but I didn’t love it. Thankfully I was able to borrow a copy. And I’m so glad I did. That game is so emotional, moving, and sad. I felt for those androids. I wanted them to obtain freedom. I felt bad as a human playing the game. It was too real. I platinumed it.

 

I don’t want to believe that Red Dead Redemption 2 will win this one. I hope it won’t. I have faith in the gaming community that they can at least acknowledge that both Spider-Man and God of War had stronger writing than Yee haw Skyrim. I believe Spider-Man will take it because there is such a large comic book audience in the gaming community and the story is straight out of a comic book. But I would not be surprised or unhappy if God of War takes this one.

5. Best Art Direction – God of War

Let’s be clear about two things. First, there is no way to properly judge this category. God of War, Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey, and Red Dead Redemption 2 all deserve to win this one. It merely comes down to which setting you prefer. Second, Return of the Obra Dinn does not deserve to be nominated. It’s exactly like Celeste being nominated for Game of the Year. This should have had six nominees instead of just five, Return of the Obra Dinn should not be one of them, and any two between Spider-Man, Detroit: Become Human, and Starlink: Battle for Atlas should be among those six. I’m actually comfortable with Octopath Traveler being nominated, but it should not win.      My pick is God of War, but again that is a completely subjective choice. All of the games I mentioned are damn beautiful games. And if the standard is simply the biggest open world wins then that’s not really fair or particularly objective.

I believe it will go to Red Dead Redemption 2. I will not say in this case that it doesn’t deserve it, but I will say that the fact that it’s still fresh in everyone’s mind helps it a lot with this particular category among many others.

2018-6

6. Best Score/Music – Spider-Man

Honestly with this category I wasn’t particularly impressed with any of the nominees this year. I would actually have chosen Detroit: Become Human, which even took the time to add an album section to its menus because they put that much work into their soundtrack.  I voted Spider-Man, but I really don’t have an opinion here. I actually do think Celeste could win this one if enough people played it because that genre is usually great for music, albeit repetitive and limited in what that music actually is.

7. Best Audio Design – Spider-Man

This one was close for me between Spider-Man and God of War. Both did an excellent job and either one deserves to win it. The reason I chose Spider-Man is that the number of gadgets, web shots, swinging, and other tiny sounds that were required to bring this game to life just sets it apart from the pack. The setting and audio aesthetic of the game just is more impressive than the other choices. It really just wins by sheer mass. Even the voice acting was impressive in that they recorded multiple takes so that they could make Peter’s voice change based on his current situation. They really just put the work in to earn this one.

I do think Spider-Man will win this one.

8. Best Performance – Bryan Dechart as Connor, Detroit: Become Human

This one sucked to choose. It was like choosing your favorite child. Let me just say that I am appalled that Jessie Williams wasn’t nominated for his performance in Detroit: Become Human. His performance was so good that I left the game thinking I wanted to watch more movies with him in them. Before now, the only thing I’d seen him in is The Cabin in the Woods (2011). He was robbed here. Christopher Judge, a classic actor by all standards that I’ve since Stargate, played an amazing Kratos. And that’s following several amazing performances by T.C. Carson, the original Kratos voice actor. Yuri Lowenthal was a great Peter Parker. It was the way I wanted Peter Parker to be. But I am going to give it to Bryan Dechart as Connor in Detroit: Become Human. He is the only one of the bunch whose character had to make drastic changes in who they were while simultaneously remaining the same person. Connor was an android and he became a human by the end of that game. It was real. Like if I saw Bryan Dechart on the street I could believe he was actually an android simulating a human. It definitely helps that Detroit: Become Human uses motion capture and models that are directly based on the actors, because that really brought them to life. And the game’s setting is super realistic even while being set in the near future. Really he was just dealt the right hand to win this one.

I think Christopher Judge will ultimately win this one for his Kratos. I just hope that the current hype of Red Dead Redemption 2 doesn’t end up handing it to Roger Clark for Arthur Morgan.

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9. Games for Impact – Life is Strange 2: Episode 1

I’m actually really disappointed in this list of nominees. Detroit: Become Human should have been nominated here. It’s about so many issues currently plaguing our society right now as well as the ethics of AI, which will have to deal with one day. It’s about racism, classism, sex slavery, agency as a person, defining humanity, and so many other things. Child abuse comes up in it. Identity politics. It really deserved to be nominated.

I believe Life is Strange will win mostly because it’s the most well-known game in the bunch. But I really don’t like the idea of a single episode being able to get nominated because that means it will probably get nominated again next year for an additional episodes.

Chosen because of noise online. Should have been Detroit.

10. Best Independent Game – Dead Cells

I’m going to be honest and say that I haven’t played any of these. I have looked into some of them this year, but none of them interested me enough to buy. The one I’m most interested in is Dead Cells so I voted for that one. I will say though that I don’t agree with the idea of a game being able to be nominated for GOTY and Indie GOTY. The whole point of the indie category is that we’ve agreed that indie and AAA aren’t really comparable. We’ve created a space where indies can thrive and be recognized because they can’t compete with AAA titles most of the time. But if we’re going to include them in the real deal then we should fully include them and do away with the indie category. Now personally I don’t think we should do that. As I’ve already said, I think Celeste shouldn’t have been nominated for GOTY. But if it is going to be nominated for GOTY, even though it isn’t going to win, I don’t think it should be able to qualify for both categories simultaneously. That being said, I do believe Celeste will win this category.

11. Best Mobile Game – Donut County

I haven’t played any of these and I don’t particularly want to. The only mobile games I played this year were Pokémon Go, Injustice 2 Mobile, Kingdom Hearts Union Cross, and Fill. I am absolutely not going to support the idea of mobile ports winning awards for anything other than best ports so I voted Donut County because it’s the only game from the list other than the phone pew pew BR games that I’d heard about before the nominees were announced. I think Fortnite is going to win though.

12. Best VR/AR Game – ASTRO BOT Rescue Mission

I think the mark of a great VR game is that it has to be in VR to truly enjoy it and get the experience of the game. I’ve played three of the games nominated and I can say that none of the ones I played absolutely had to be in VR. I haven’t played ASTRO BOT Rescue Mission but from what I’ve been told it’s the Mario 64 of VR. Supposedly it revolutionized the platform and cannot be truly experienced on a TV. If that’s really the case then it deserves to win and I think it will win based on what I’ve heard about it compared to the other nominees.

astro bot

13. Best Action Game – Far Cry 5

This is a shitty list of titles and I think we need to better define action game because there are definitely games that could have been included here that weren’t. I’m also not a huge fan of Action and Action Adventure being separate because this allowed five meh games the chance to win an award while forcing five awesome games to duke it out in yet another category that Red Dead Redemption 2 will probably end up winning simply because of the date it was released. I chose Far Cry 5 because it’s the least mediocre of the list provided but really this category is just an insult to the rest of the AAA relevant categories. I do think that next year it will have some great titles depending on how they split up games like Ghost of Tsushima, Kingdom Hearts III, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, Devil May Cry V, and some other already announced titles.

I think COD will probably take it because it disappointed people less than Destiny 2, but apparently people liked Forsaken so it’s anyone’s ballgame.

14. Best Action/Adventure Game – God of War

If we’re focusing solely on gameplay in the Action/Adventure genre it’s God of War with Spider-Man at a close second. Again, Red Dead Redemption 2 hype, but really God of War deserves this one.

15. Best Role Playing Game – Monster Hunter World

Where is Starlink: Battle for Atlas? That game got robbed this year. The one nomination it did get makes no sense and it absolutely deserved to be nominated in other categories, including this one. Now let me be clear in saying the winner is clearly and undebatably  Monster Hunter World and it will win. But Starlink deserved to be nominated in this category.

16. Best Fighting Game – Soul Calibur VI

It just is Soul Calibur VI. That’s not debatable. Dragon Ball FighterZ was a nice idea, but people who actually played both games know the truth. Soul Calibur VI will and should win.

17. Best Family Game – Super Mario Party

Starlink: Battle for Atlas shouldn’t have been nominated in this category. I think it was included simply because they realized it is a great game that deserved to be nominated for something so they just squeezed it in here. This actually was a tough choice. I think arguments can be made for both Overcooked 2 and Super Mario Party, as well as Mario Tennis Aces, but Super Mario Party has the most depth as a game that also works well for entire families to play. It deserves to win and I think it will. The only thing I will say is that Overcooked 2 is multiplatform so there is a chance that more voters played it than any of the other games, all of which are Nintendo Switch exclusives. Ignoring Starlink of course.

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18. Best Strategy Game – The Banner Saga 3

I haven’t played any of these and I’m honestly not super interested in any of them except The Banner Saga 3 so I voted for that but I withhold my prediction because honestly none of these have been particularly noteworthy or popular so I can’t even really take hype into account.

19. Best Sports/Racing Game – Mario Tennis Aces

I picked Mario Tennis Aces here because I think innovation trumps realism. All the other nominees have done their best to rehash the same formula for the umpteenth time with slightly improved graphics. Mario Tennis Aces is the only game that really innovated the sports genre and tried to make a game that was fun as opposed to just realistic. My prediction is FIFA 19 due to the sheer volume of players though.

20. Best Multiplayer Game – Monster Hunter World

Monster Hunter World deserves it. Fortnite will win it. Moving on.

21. Best Student Game – LIFF

Sadly I haven’t heard of any of these student games. Usually there’s one that stands out from the crowd and gets some real attention but none of these were able to make it to any of my various feeds or new sources this year so I have no opinion. I voted for LIFF because it looks cool.

22. Best Debut Indie Game – Yoku’s Island Express

Yoku’s Island Express is the only game from this list I’d heard of before the nominees were announced so that means it had at least enough hype to get my attention, which is why I voted for it. I predict it or Moss will win.

I’m obviously not going to do the eSports and content creator categories because why would I waste my and your time with that trash? As I said, overall this was a highly competitive year for games. So many titles were excellent and I’m thankful that I was able to play so many of them while they were new. Next year looks amazing too so The Game Awards 2019 will likely be just as difficult to judge. Thanks for reading. Let me know your picks and predictions in the comments.

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